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It’s the excess of dirtiness that makes us notice it and want to describe it. Nature isn’t clean. It’s neither clean nor dirty.

There’s excess when accretion determines a new behavior (behavior: of the order of the gesture, the discontinuous; like the ritual, it’s therefore something that structural analysis can grasp).

The law authorizes the infraction, it’s really marking the excess of dirtiness.

~Roland Barthes

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KEEP IT DIRTY is asking everyone to stop washing their cars. As in, right now. Just don’t do it. It’s easy because you don’t have to do anything. It’s also dirty. It’s a new dirty geo-politics. Droughts are dusty, but you’re not dusty enough yet. And neither is your car.

KEEP IT DIRTY is also an affiliative network, oriented towards ecological consciousness raising and collective image production in the interest of posthuman environmental solidarity. Which means this is a site where we invite everyone to hail and confabulate and perform the dirty with us. You say you love the earth? Well, you need to get dirty, then. And tell us how to do it, too.

KEEP IT DIRTY is a love-in that practices Leo Bersani’s impersonal narcissism. It wants the shock of the touch of your dirtiness, but without any claims. Except on the future.

KEEP IT DIRTY likes it when you talk dirty.

KEEP IT DIRTY is asking you to NOT work at the car wash because it actually IS better to dig a ditch.

Do we really mean to take shelter from our jouissance in the order of utility, to become “a branch of the service of goods,” in the mistaken hope that the “human sciences” will be rewarded for doing so? (Aranye Fradenburg)

KEEP IT DIRTY reclaims jouissance for the environmental movement, in its attempt to move beyond consumerist models of sustainability and towards a more shared, together, and loving model for planetary stewardship at the local level. It asks: “What would Lacan say?”

KEEP IT DIRTY says you can do nothing, and it’s fabulous.

KEEP IT DIRTY embraces a practical negativity and inhumanism that refuses resignation.

Practical negativity refuses to be a resignation, but it also refuses to contribute to the system and develop a systematic attitude toward the affirmative stance “implicit” in the construction of the system. (Reza Negarestani)

KEEP IT DIRTY is the world’s largest public art project.

KEEP IT DIRTY rehabilitates existing cultural modes and outre anti-social actions in the interest of their ethical foils.

KEEP IT DIRTY recognizes, with Mary Douglas, that purity is indeed next to danger, but we need to get closer to that danger. By getting dirtier. Fuck cleanliness boundaries.

KEEP IT DIRTY wants to mingle with the earth.

There was never a time when human agency was anything other than an interfolding network of humanity and nonhumanity; today this mingling has become harder to ignore. (Jane Bennett)

KEEP IT DIRTY longs for the mud of 1969 Woodstock.

KEEP IT DIRTY uses your laziness in the interest of a better California, a better world, and a better tomorrow.

KEEP IT DIRTY is a platform and a paradigm. It’s asking for hop-ons.

KEEP IT DIRTY is an open framework for planetary ontology.

New sorts of inventive thinking and making are now possible, and called for, in response to new material situations of daily life. A number of artists, designers, and philosophers of change and emergence are deliberately situating their aesthetic work and experimental thinking within the geologic as a condition of our present time. Some contemporary artists locate their bodies and imaginations within jostling and unstable physical, social, political, and economic situations that arise from and act back upon the earth’s materialities, forces and events. The result is an increase in aesthetic works that explore and creatively respond to the geologic depth of “now.” (Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse)

KEEP IT DIRTY embraces the deep time of the geologic now.

KEEP IT DIRTY uses superficiality and the automatic for the interests of a dirty-time geo-historical paradigm.

KEEP IT DIRTY is mine. KEEP IT DIRTY is yours. KEEP IT DIRTY is ours.

KEEP IT DIRTY is not necessarily theirs, because it is yours, mine, and ours. KEEP IT DIRTY is an act of landscape architecture.

DUSTINESS IS SOLIDARITY WITH THE LAND. EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT TO BE DIRTY.

KEEP IT DIRTY writes a blank check for tomorrow. Scrawled in mud.

KEEP IT DIRTY says “you know what I mean.” And you say, “yeah, I won’t move a finger, then.”

KEEP IT DIRTY says “I’ve become conscious and so can you, starting yesterday.

KEEP IT DIRTY says you’re working for the environment and you don’t even know it.

KEEP IT DIRTY sees the world from the ground level. Consider yourself grounded.

The world is deep. And deeper than day has ever comprehended. (Friedrich Nietzsche)

KEEP IT DIRTY wrings the purposive guilt out of  sustainability and calls for a full-hearted embrace of everything we do bad, for good.

KEEP IT DIRTY vociferously rejects the moralizing, egocentric, and falsely prophetic ambitiousness of our start-up present, for a future consciousness of the duration of the dirty, earthy now.

KEEP IT DIRTY is madly in love with entropy and narcissism.

KEEP IT DIRTY is decadence, made good.

KEEP IT DIRTY is inaction in action.

KEEP IT DIRTY FUCKING IS AND WILL BE, MOTHERFUCKERS. DON’T YOU GET IT?

KEEP IT DIRTY is reparative.

KEEP IT DIRTY is optimistic.

KEEP IT DIRTY heard you mumble “ahhh … fuck it” and said coyly: “OK.”

KEEP IT DIRTY is an affirmative reformation of the phrase “hell no!”

KEEP IT DIRTY is more subversive than you think, but probably less subversive than you think it is.

KEEP IT DIRTY is an instruction and a movement. It is also a fashion statement.

In far too much continental philosophy, the Earth is a cold, dead place enlivened only by human thought—either as a thing to be exploited, or as an object of nostalgia. Geophilosophy seeks instead to question the ground of thinking itself, the relation of the inorganic to the capacities and limits of thought. (Ben Woodard)

KEEP IT DIRTY puts the eros back into heroism.

KEEP IT DIRTY encourages a reparative reconsideration and re-presentation of extant cultural modes in the interest of certain goals. It is not a remixing and it is not a parody and it is not satire: it is fun and funny and smart and sassy and sexy as fuck, for serious.

KEEP IT DIRTY answers the question: how can networks scale and retain utility, through aesthetics?

KEEP IT DIRTY is structuralism in action.

KEEP IT DIRTY humbly recognizes that our android assemblages are human, and is a common version of “the saint who plays at being a man” — who’s “just like everyone else:”

[They] don’t wash, not as a form of mortification, but because they’ve renounced the world’s habits. Already noted: dirtiness functions as an anti-norm, anti-pollution. It sets you apart from society (a theme taken up by certain sorts of hippies). (Roland Barthes)

KEEP IT DIRTY takes on the precise meaning of its counterpart. Washing=hatred. Cleanliness ruling over our relativity as bacteriod-assemblages is represented by The Detailer; in the car-wash, to begin with, you enter as filth, but slowly and with much expended labor your vehicle relearns its factory freshness. The Detailer is well-pleased, for the car wash has saved your vehicle from its attempted re-becoming one with the earth. And thus: THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILER.

DO NOT USE THE TERMS WHITE, BROWN, OR BLACK. DO NOT REPRESENT DIRTINESS AS TRANSFORMATIVE. DO NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, APPEAL TO MYTHS OF A NOBLE SAVAGE OR PRIMAL HUMAN IDENTITY. DO NOT TALK ABOUT CULTURE OR SOCIETY. DO NOT REPRESENT DIFFERENCE.

Listen, my angel, I have every wish in the world to satisfy you in this matter, because you know the respect I have for tastes, for fantasies: however baroque they may be, I find them all respectable, for one is not the master of them, and because the most singular and bizarre of them, when well examined, always depends on a principle of tact.

~Roland Barthes, quoting Marquis de Sade

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If you are interested in joining this dirty desiring-assemblage and would also like to contribute material to this platform, please contact either Samuel Ray Jacobson (samuelrayjacobson@gmail.com) or Eileen Joy (eileenajoy@gmail.com).

 

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COPYRIGHT 2014

SAMUEL RAY JACOBSON + EILEEN JOY